“Currents and Currency: Cultural Circulations in the Mediterranean and Beyond” – Suna & İnan Kıraç Center for Mediterranean Civilizations – Antalya, Turchia, 13-15 Giugno 2019 

Il Workshop residenziale, a cura della Koç University di Istanbul, è un progetto di:

Megan C. MacDonald

EURIAS Residential fellow, 2018-2019 / IMéRA – Institut d’études avancées d’Aix-Marseille Université

Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature

Koç University

Istanbul

e

Ceyhun Arslan

Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions Fellow

Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature

Koç University

Descrizione:

Currents and Currency: Cultural Circulations in the Mediterranean and Beyond aims to bring together cultural works that constitute alternative archives of the Mediterranean in order to reassess the current geographical divides that shape typical understandings of the Mediterranean and beyond. It thus opens up comparative paradigms that suggest new perspectives on translation, circulation, migration, art, and literature. What can circulation and currency tell us about current Mediterranean cultural productions? How do they travel? Do they leave traces?

 

Vedi il programma dettagliato qui:

WORKSHOP_PROGRAM_-_Currents_and_Currency-3

Annunci

CfP “Pre-fixing the Colonial: Theory and Practice”

Editors: Marta Cariello, Luigi Cazzato and Luisa Pèrcopo

Description:

Prefixes have always been cause for controversy when it comes to colonialism. On one hand, the “post” in “postcolonial” has famously sparked debate about temporalities and epistemology; on the other, a growing school of thought claims that turning to the term “decolonial” would disambiguate the content and reach deeper into the power relations at play.

     Postcolonial theory is often considered as reaching back to Edward Said’s pioneering critical work while decolonial theory is a critical disposition that started with the works of Anibal Quijano and Enrique Dussel. Postcolonial studies was born within the nexus connecting the Subaltern Studies Group in India with Anglo America (Said-Spivak-Bhabha), while the “decolonial option” was born thanks to the Latin American Subaltern Studies Group scholars in the USA. These (albeit most likely unfixed) points of origin explain the different stress placed on Western colonial history. If, within postcolonial thinking, colonial history mainly starts sometime between the 17th and the 18th centuries, when Orientalism was initially born as a discipline – though, for example, Paul Gilroy, Arjun Appadurai and Janet Abu-Lughod speak of much wider temporalities – for decolonial thinkers, that history starts with the conquest of the “New World” and, as Quijano puts it, the rise of the “coloniality of power”. The choice of point of origin is crucial because it highlights the historical moment when modern European identity emerged and constructed the Other of Europe.

     However, the dividing lines between postcolonial and decolonial theories/thinking are quite blurry and overlapping, and this in itself is an issue for debates. For instance Dipesh Chakrabarty proposes a frame to decolonise world knowledge from a Eurocentric perspective, Walter Mignolo to delink from it and search not for a new paradigm but for an alternative one: un pensamiento otro. How does the common ground between both epistemological fields interrogate us? How can we articulate another thinking entirely, pre-fixed, post-fixed, but certainly not fixed?

     We invite scholars from the fields of postcolonial and decolonial thought, literary and cultural studies, visual and performing/ance arts, history, gender studies, diaspora studies, media studies, critical race theory, and all related and transdisciplinary areas, to join in the conversation and submit an abstract.

Proposals may deal with the following (or further related) topics:

⎯ postcolonial and decolonial genealogies

⎯ decolonizing theory and language

⎯ decolonizing the academia

⎯ decolonizing the literary canon

⎯ the postcolonial/decolonial public intellectual

⎯ art as critical language overcoming theory (and prefixes)

⎯ colonial and imperial difference

⎯ colonial discursive formations

⎯ coloniality and (new) media studies

⎯ coloniality and race/class/gender/religion

⎯ coloniality and migrations

⎯ coloniality and human rights.

 

Deadline for abstracts: 30 September 2019

Deadline for completed articles: 31 December 2019

Marta Cariello: marta.cariello@unicampania.it

Luigi Cazzato: luigicarmine.cazzato@uniba.it

Luisa Pèrcopo: percopol1@cardiff.ac.uk

CC: anglistica@unior.it